Keyword:

3d printing

igus® 2019 as an exhibitor at the Rapid.Tech + FabCon in Erfurt

Dirk Zacharias | 26. June 2019

Experience 3D-printing with igus® live This year, too, we will be there to present our latest 3D printing innovations and products at the Erfurt trade fair. All topics related to Additive Manufacturing will be exhibited. We have everything that matters at our stand – from filaments and our FDM, SLS and SLA printing processes up […]

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Gears in 3D-printing – View the recording of the igus Live webinar now

Sven Weber | 15. May 2019

You missed the last live webinar on gears in 3d-printing? No problem, we’ll share the recording with you via youtube. But what is the webinar about? Here a short overview for you. How do I construct a gear? Which process do I use to manufacture it? And which material is best suited for which type […]

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“How long does my printed gear last?” New igus online tool predicts running time

Sven Weber | 13. May 2019

To change torque or speed over one or more stages, gears are used in some gearboxes. Since gears with complex involute toothing are often required, which cannot be designed without tools, igus developed the gear configurator two years ago. This was extended last year by the configuration of double gears. In just a few steps, […]

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Repair of an vintage car speedometer with the help of 3D printing service

Guest author: Dr. Jörg Pühler | 18. April 2019

On the speedometer of my Stanley 750B from 1924 the mileage counter didn’t work anymore. It is a speedometer from Stewart-Warner, Chicago, type M-9. Failure analysis After dismantling, the mistake was obvious: the gear on the first intermediate shaft, which meshes with the worm on the input shaft, was completely ruined. The pinion was no […]

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fire-resistant filament

RW370 – the fire-resistant high temperature filament

Sven Weber | 10. April 2019

With an upper short-term application temperature of + 190° C and an upper long-term application temperature of + 170°C, the RW370 filament is definitely one of those that cannot be processed with a commercially available 3d printer, like an ultimaker. The engineers from the business unit of additive manufacturing at igus have developed a 3D […]

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