Tag: Long path

How do I calculate the chain length for my supply?

Phillip Hagedorn | 7. July 2019

The chain length calculation (only in German) is made for an unsupported or gliding application. Unsupported: If the supply point is outside the centre, the formula for calculating the chain length is as follows: K = π x R + (2 x T) Lk = length of the e-chain S = length of travel S/2 […]

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Can I also implement a long travel without a guide trough?

Phillip Hagedorn | 3. July 2019

Yes, if, for example, the space is very cramped or a trough is out of the question for cost reasons. Then, e.g. an autoglide system can be used. A comb-like autoglide crossbar and a side-mounted sliding wing merge with the e-chain. With the selected series up to 80 m travel and a travel speed of […]

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How do I calculate the chain length for a long travel?

Phillip Hagedorn | 3. July 2019

Lk = S/2 + K2 The e-chain glides on one half of the lower run and on the other half on a glide bar, as shown in the picture above. Lk = length of the e-chain S = length of travel S/2 = half length of travel R = bend radius ΔM = deviation from […]

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Why do I have to lower the suspension point in a long travel?

Phillip Hagedorn | 3. July 2019

A lowered connecting point is absolutely necessary for every gliding application: To prevent chain breakage through critical sag. To reduce wear (if the moving end is not lowered, there is more abrasion) Example: If we move the e-chain from right to left till the gap between the upper run and the lower run is 1mm, […]

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How do I balance alignment tolerances from my travel to the guide trough?

Phillip Hagedorn | 3. July 2019

The igus balancing unit FTA for gliding applications with energy chains. The floating moving end provides compensation for moving end arms with strong lateral offset. As a result, the energy chain operates neatly without force in the guide trough. This ensures a reduction of wear. The service life of the application is thus extended many […]

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